How to Make the Frightening Transition From College to Adult Life

Adulting, Author: #NAMB Guest Author

Making the transition from college life to adult life can be difficult, especially if you were one of the partiers who stayed up all night and then crammed for the exams in the final hours. Adult life may seem like it is fun, but it’s filled with responsibilities, stress and sometimes even anxiety as you learn to handle all types of situations on your own. But, there are some ways to make transitioning from college life to adult life just a little bit easier for you.

Cut back on parties
In your college days, you may have partied from dusk till dawn, but those days are now just a distant memory. As you enter adult life, you do not want to party that entire time because, after all, you do have to wake up and go to work in the morning. While you do not have to stop partying altogether, you should at least not party throughout the week. Save it for the weekend when you can go out and enjoy the company of your friends. While there is nothing wrong with enjoying a cold one on Wednesday night, you should do so in moderation to ensure that you can still handle your responsibilities in the morning. You’ll save money, too!

Get on a routine
Not everyone can be on the same routine, so you need to figure out what works for you and stick to it. While you do not have to plan your day down to every minute of every hour, you should have an idea of when you need to do things. For example, you go to bed every night between 9:00 and 10:00 p.m. and you wake up every morning between 6:00 and 7:00 a.m. The more you stick to a routine, the more time you will have throughout your day. Make sure you plan for time to exercise, laundry and other activities that may be part of your daily life.

Keep your home free from clutter
If you have a lot of clutter in your home, it can cause you to feel anxious and distract you from the things that you need to do. Take some time to clean up that clutter and keep your home as organized as possible. The less clutter the better. If you never knew that clutter could affect you, a 2011 study out of the Princeton University Neuroscience Institute showed that when people are surrounded by stuff they do not want or need, it has a negative effect on the brain’s ability to process information and focus.

Turn off the electronics
From smartphones to TVs, electronics exist in just about every home. While you may have been stuck to the side of your phone in college, now that you have transitioned into the adult world, you need to make sure you unplug these devices and take time for yourself. Too much time on electronic devices can negatively impact your mind and ability to focus on the things you need to. Step away every day for about an hour or two and do something that you want to do. Some great activities to consider include walking, heading to the gym, reading a book or even interacting with your friends in a face-to-face setting.

Get your student debt under control
Did you know that the average graduate in the Class of 2017 has over $20,000 in student debt? If you are anything like me, you are probably trying to wrap your head around your student loan bill. Student loans can be complicated. But the first thing you should do is create a spreadsheet where you document the different types of student loans you have. Do you have federal student loans? What about private student debt? What is your interest rate? In your spreadsheet, you should outline the type of student loan, interest rate, monthly payment and total interest cost. Next, setup auto-pay so that you never make a late payment. Lastly, don’t be afraid to prepay student debt. Both federal and private educational loans do not have prepayment fees.

You’ll have to take care of yourself
In your college life, you were used to your friends waking you up, having someone always by your side and being able to eat ramen noodles in your dorm. Now that you no longer live in your dorm room, you are responsible for yourself and taking care of yourself. This means that you will need to grocery shop and cook food day in and out to make sure you receive your nutrients and stay hydrated. In addition, you will have to worry about waking yourself up for work in the morning because there will be no one else nearby to do it for you. The things that you were once used to in college are now going to be things that you must do on your own.

Once you graduate college, a lot is going to change as you transition into the real world. It is important that you not only understand what to expect, but that you are ready to make the changes necessary to help you grow and prosper in your new adult life. One of the most important things to keep in mind is that you will be responsible for your actions and also responsible for making sure that you show up to work every day and handle all of your obligations — something you may not have needed to do in college.

 

About the Author:


Lauren Davidson is a millennial transitioning from college to adult life, working to pay down her student loan debt through freelancing.

 

5 Soft Skills You Can Learn From Working in Retail…and Can Apply to Any Job

Author: Brett Pucino, Career Advice

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Working in retail typically gets a bad rap. Before I met my career coach, I didn’t see the value of my five-plus years of retail experience working with three different brands at the Woodbury Common Premium Outlet Center.

Now I see that I’ve honed several soft skills that are transferable to any industry. I’m going to share five of those skills with you here.

1. Working in a Fast-Paced Environment
Before we go any further, I want to clarify something: there are varying levels of the retail industry. Retail in a small town mall is very different than retail in an outlet center that is an international tourist destination 40 miles north of New York City.

I don’t know anything but a fast-paced environment where I had to constantly bounce between selling to customers and maintaining visual standards. After working five consecutive Black Fridays, I’m confident in my ability to handle any fast-paced environment.

2. Verbal Communication Skills
There’s more to working in retail than just folding clothes. A good portion of a retail worker’s shift is spent having conversations with customers – especially when working on register.

The ability to have a conversation with all types of people helps you become a “people person.” If the thought of talking to strangers all day makes you nervous, then you aren’t a people person. I credit my first retail job at PUMA, which I worked as a senior in high school, with making me comfortable talking to strangers from all different walks of life.

3. Conflict Resolution Skills
According to Monster.com, conflict resolution skills are among the most desirable soft skills in today’s job market. Dealing with an irate customer, when you break it down to fundamentals, isn’t much different than dealing with an unhappy client.

Every time I turned an unhappy customer into a satisfied one, I increased my competency in conflict resolution.

4. Organizational Skills
When you walk into a well-maintained store, every single item is arranged in a very specific way. Items can be arranged by size, style and color.

I used to think of visual merchandising as a hard skill, but when I looked back upon that experience to create my current skills portfolio, I realized that visual merchandising is how one applies organizational skills in the retail industry.

5. Sales Skills
Last but not least, working in retail teaches you how to sell. During my three-plus years at PUMA I learned how to sell using proven company sales strategy. Although I dreaded those daily pre-shift role play scenarios, I look back and thank my manager for making them mandatory.

I was able to use the sales strategies I learned at PUMA to get, and excel at, a commissioned job selling DIRECTV, AT&T and Samsung products.

Have you ever worked a retail job? What was your experience? Let us know in the comment box below!

5 Soft Skills You Can Learn From Working in Retail… and Can Apply to Any Job

Author: Brett Pucino, Career Advice

Working in retail typically gets a bad rap. Before I met my career coach, I didn’t see the value of my five-plus years of retail experience working with three different brands at the Woodbury Common Premium Outlet Center.

Now I see that I’ve honed several soft skills that are transferable to any industry. I’m going to share five of those skills with you here.

Working in a fast-paced environment
Before we go any further, I want to clarify something: there are varying levels of the retail industry. Retail in a small town mall is very different than retail in an outlet center that is an international tourist destination 40 miles north of New York City. I don’t know anything but a fast-paced environment where I had to constantly bounce between selling to customers and maintaining visual standards. After working five consecutive Black Fridays, I’m confident in my ability to handle any fast-paced environment.

Verbal communication skills
There’s more to working in retail than just folding clothes. A good portion of a retail worker’s shift is spent having conversations with customers — especially when working on register. The ability to have a conversation with all types of people helps you become a “people person.” If the thought of talking to strangers all day makes you nervous, then you aren’t a people person. I credit my first retail job at PUMA, which I worked as a senior in high school, with making me comfortable talking to strangers from all different walks of life.

Conflict resolution skills
According to Monster.com, conflict resolution skills are among the most desirable soft skills in today’s job market. Dealing with an irate customer, when you break it down to fundamentals, isn’t much different than dealing with an unhappy client. Every time I turned an unhappy customer into a satisfied one, I increased my competency in conflict resolution.

Organizational skills
When you walk into a well-maintained store, every single item is arranged in a very specific way. Items can be arranged by size, style and color. I used to think of visual merchandising as a hard skill, but when I looked back upon that experience to create my current skills portfolio, I realized that visual merchandising is how one applies organizational skills in the retail industry.

Sales skills
Last but not least, working in retail teaches you how to sell. During my three-plus years with one retail brand, I learned how to sell using proven company sales strategy. Although I dreaded those daily pre-shift role play scenarios, I look back and thank my manager for making them mandatory. I was able to use the sales strategies I learned at that retail brand to get, and excel at, a commissioned job selling technology products.

Have you ever worked a retail job? What was your experience? Let us know in the comment box below!