Home office

What it’s Really Like to Work From Home

Are you a millennial who works from home…or wants to work from home? Here’s some firsthand experience.

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Remote jobs are becoming increasingly popular in today’s technology-based landscape. To bring that point home even further, an Indeed search for “remote jobs” in New York City pulls up 3,397 results. Millennials may be digital natives — but according to Forbes, we are not responsible for this trend in the popularity of working from home. That does not, however, mean we can’t take advantage of it and utilize our natural technological ease in a work from home setting.

Even though I’ve previously written about what it’s truly like to work in an office, I mentioned that I also work from home on a regular basis. While there are a lot of perks, there are a number of myths about the work from home life that I’m here to bust — and, as you’ll see, I also had some help from fellow millennials who work from home.

First of all, I do work in my pajamas — and often. And I’ll admit, that part is everything you’d imagine it would be. I also get to keep my TV on while I’m working (so Parks and Rec, Veronica Mars and true crime shows are often found playing in the background). But while not all remote jobs make this part a requirement, I have to remote in to an office computer from 9-5:30. If I’m going to grab lunch, I have to send a message. If I’m going to run to Starbucks, I have to send a message. And I’ve even missed a message because I was in the bathroom!

Another aspect of working from home that you may not think of? I don’t get snow days. Recently our office was closed due to a snowstorm, but I worked the whole day when the rest of the staff didn’t!

All of that said, I think the ability to work remotely is a great tradeoff for not having the unexpected day off. I work well independently, and am always happy to stay in the comfort of my own room as opposed to driving 45 minutes to work.

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I work for a company where they allow me to work from home two days a week. Working from home can be a blessing and a curse…if you have kids. I enjoy having the flexibility of getting up a little later and not having as many interruptions as I would in the office. Don’t get me wrong, I still have interruptions, but they are from my toddler, who also needs my attention. It can be hard to juggle both at the same time but when my son goes to school, I have peace…at least for a couple of hours.

There are also downsides to working from home…like snow days. Before being able to work from home, when the office was closed on a snow day, I was able to have a day off. Now, not so much because the company expects you to work from home.

Overall, I wouldn’t change my work from home schedule for the world. Not many people get to do it, and I am grateful that mine has allowed me to do so. And sometimes when I am having a bad day, I just turn to my son’s smile and he makes it all worth it!

– Dana Angel, Graphic Designer and Owner of Imaginique Art 

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One misconception that I come across a lot as someone who works from home is that I basically do whatever I want all day. Working from home requires you to motivate yourself even more than working in an office. I do have the ability to structure my day for when I work best and around other appointments, but in reality, it’s up to me to stick to my deadlines, make sure I have systems in place to keep me productive, not to mention find clients and projects. I love having flexibility in my schedule even though it might mean I need to work extra hours the week before. At the end of the day, my business doesn’t work unless I do.

– Nicole Booz, Editor-in-Chief of GenTwenty

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